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refurbished sewing machines

Why Second-hand is Best!

IMG_4725Sewing4Everyone specialises in the sale of second hand sewing machines (such as this lovely Singer 29k sewing machine), but why is it better to buy refurbished sewing machines, rather than new?

In general, second-hand goods are much, much better for the environment. We live in an age of things. If you talk to your grandparents, they will tell you people lived with a lot less stuff in Ye Olden Days. And you know what? They didn’t suffer for it.

When you buy second-hand goods in general, you cut down on manufacturing demands, and you keep items out of landfill. Huge amounts of man-made goods are routinely thrown away, but refurbished sewing machines give longer life to items other people can use. Let’s save the earth, one Singer 29k sewing machine at a time!

If you are someone who likes good-quality items refurbished sewing machines make perfect sense. You will get a reliable, premium machine at a reasonable price. Wouldn’t you rather spend money on a stellar, old sewing machine than a brand-new lesser make? Here at Sewing4Everyone, we sell some of the best makes of sewing machines there are – the Singer 29k sewing machine, for example, and the Jones Brother Heavy Duty sewing machines.

There is also the thrill of the hunt that comes from second-hand shopping. If you love sewing you will know there are iconic sewing machines out there. By browsing these pages, you’ve just found your paradise!

Finally, a second-hand sewing machine is an investment in quality. We only provide the very best refurbished sewing machines. We hand-select our machines (and we are experts when it comes to the world of the needle and thread) and we are always on hand to give you advice, should you need it. Your sewing machine will be an investment for years to come.

The quality is assured. Before our machines leave us, they are serviced by our trained sewing machine mechanics to check that they meet our standards for reliability, performance and style. Our heavy-duty sewing machines are perfect for thick and/or tough fabrics, and you’ll receive a manual and help guide to get you started.

Why not start your sewing adventure today? From the Singer 29k sewing machine, to the Janome Semi Industrial Zigzag Sewing Machine, we’ve got them all!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Antique Sewing Machines – the Singer 48K

 

singer 48k sewing machine

When it comes to antique sewing machines, a well-known example if the Singer 48K machine.

The 48k machine was only made at Singer’s Kilbowie factory in Clydebank, Scotland between the years 1900 and 1913. According to the company records, at least half a million machines were made, and at the time were priced at £4 12s 6d – roughly £460 in today’s money. It was Singer’s cheapest selling family sewing machine.

The 48K is a transverse shuttle model – the shuttle moves from left to right. Its other features include

  • A hybrid shuttle
  • A self-setting standard 15×1 needle and not the old round shanked, 12×1
  • An upper tension control sited right of the faceplate
  • A shuttle eject mechanism
  • Black hand wheels – this is probably because some countries taxed machinery import with plated parts, as they were thought of as luxury items.

Attractive Antique Sewing Machines

It is a very pretty-looking machine. Singer only decorated the 48K machines with the Ottoman Carnation ornamentation and the Ottoman Carnation with Indian Star decals. Why? The idea is that India was an emerging market at the start of the 20th Century, and the use of the Indian Star sticker was a deliberate attempt to stimulate the market.

What makes the Singer 48K something of a mystery when it comes to antique sewing machines is that it used technology which was outdated at the time. Other Singer models were better machines, and far more up to date. Why produce something like this?

singer 48k sewing machine

The theory goes that the machine was designed to compete with German-made, high-arm (the high arm allows free movement of the material) machines that had dominated the British market for many years.

Designed for Export?

Another theory is that it was intended for export to developing countries, but the majority of advertising materials (and there aren’t that many) relate to Singer 48K machines being sold in the UK. There are also adverts for it in New York and Russia, though!

Nowadays, the Singer 48K is a rare thing, which perhaps gives credence to the idea that 500,000 machines were not made. Some experts on antique sewing machines have disputed this number, claiming that a sewing machine that only shows up every six months on eBay is very rare. The primary production period seems to be 1902-05.

singer 48k sewing machine

It is thought that production of the machine might have stopped for various reasons. Number one that it just wasn’t that great a sewing machine. Another reason might be the start of the First World War and the drop in imports of German goods. There was no longer a need for a machine that competed with the German high-arm sewing machine.

Whatever – the machine is something of a mystery, and that makes it very exciting indeed!

Sewing4Everyone sells refurbished and antique sewing machines. Check out our range to find out more.

 

 

 

Why More and More People Want to Sew

vintage sewing machine

Craft fairs are more popular than ever.

Thinking about buying a vintage sewing machine? Why? Our shops are full of clothes, but more people than ever are choosing to sew at home.

Once upon a time, sewing was a skill that most girls were taught. Certainly, young women would be expected to sew in the home – from creating their own clothes and outfits for their family on a vintage sewing machine handed down from their mothers to making cushion covers, curtains and carrying out small mending jobs.

Then, there was an about-turn in the 70s and 80s, as sewing was regarded with suspicion because it seemed too gender-specific. Modern women didn’t want to learn to sew. They wanted to learn what men were being taught, or skills that seemed less ‘feminine’. Groups that had favoured and fostered traditional skills such as sewing and knitting (the Women’s Institute, for example) were thought of as the preserve of older women.

A New Hobby and A Vintage Sewing Machine

A cultural shift took place in the noughties. Sewing and knitting were ‘sexed’ up. Debbie Stoller’s Stich and B***h reinvented knitting for another generation, turning it into a fresh, new hobby. The Women’s Institute started to attract younger members, who wanted to make their own stuff.

Numerous celebrities were pictured knitting as they waited between takes while filming (knitting, unlike smoking, is a good thing to do with your hands), and shows such as Kirstie Allsopp’s Homemade Home came on the scene. Home-made was officially cool once more.

Other aspects that play into people’s desire to sew are sustainability and provenance. Yes, our shops are full of clothes, but where do they come from and who are they made by? Made in China and transported here? Modern consumers have more knowledge than ever at their fingertips. The new sewers know that if they can use a vintage sewing machine and create their own clothing, they will do far less damage to faraway communities and the environment.

Craft Fairs

If ever there was proof of the popularity of sewing and crafts in general, look at the number of fairs and events that take place across the UK every year. From cross-stitch to quilt-making, there are any number of shows taking place. In the next few months, for example, you can visit the Abingdon Vintage and Antiques Fair, the Sew and Beads Quilt and Craft Fair in West Sussex or the Handmaiden Craft Fair in Essex.

Social media has played its part too. Sites such as Instagram and Pinterest are ideal places to showcase your home-made clothes and terrific skills. It’s terrifically satisfying to put up a picture of something you have sewn yourself and receive numerous ‘likes’, pins or comments expressing admiration. There’s nothing like a little external validation to cheer us up.

We think even more people will choose sewing at home as a hobby in the future. The home-made trend isn’t going to go away.

We specialise in the sales of pre-owned, heavy-duty and vintage sewing machines for domestic and industrial use. Contact us on (01782) 943667 to discuss your requirements.

 

 

The Advantages of Creating Your Own Clothes

refurbished sewing machine

Have you jumped on the sewing bandwagon, or are you the happy new owner of a refurbished sewing machine, and keen to start to start your sewing journey?

There are lots of reasons why making your own clothes offer advantages…

Ethically sound. Sure, pre-made clothing is cheap, but cheap clothing has its own price. While clothing has decreased in price, the human and environmental costs have soared. People making cheap fashions often work in horrible conditions and for poverty wages, while the environment is affected because cheap clothing uses more resources and toxic chemicals.

Personalised. Even if you use patterns, the materials you choose for your outfit will be different. You’ll be wearing something no-one else has. The seams, buttons, zips and stitching will be uniquely yours. If you have an eye for great material, you’ll create eye-catching outfits people will envy.

Old school, vintage sewing machines. There is something hugely satisfying about the old-fashioned nature of making your own clothes. Double that effect by running up garments on a refurbished sewing machine.

old scissors various threads and sewing tools on wooden table

It’s a terrific hobby. Creating your own clothes can take up as much or as little time as you can afford. You might embark on this hobby and discover you LOVE it. Sewing something takes in many different elements. First, you must plan it either creating your own sewing pattern or buying one. Then, there are the materials to be chosen and bought. You’ll learn to lay out and cut, tack and sew, using different stitches to suit.

Find new friends. You’ll discover that lots of people share your hobby, and they all love getting together to swap skills and learn from each other. From craft fairs to weekly meet-ups, sewing events are now widespread. Want to find a group near you? Check out the sewing directory.

It’s something to do with your kids. As we mentioned above, sewing involves lots of different skills. Simple projects for kids, though, could include taking up trousers and skirts or making pillow cases or cushion covers. Remember, sewing isn’t gender specific. Little boys will enjoy it just as much as little girls. And it doesn’t need to be an expensive hobby. Buy one of our refurbished machines, and you’ll be getting a great piece of kit for minimal expense.

Satisfaction. We reckon this is a number one reason why so many people love making their own clothes. A home-made skirt, pair of trousers or dress feels much more precious than anything you can buy.

Sewing4Everyone specialises in used and vintage sewing machines (including the refurbished sewing machine option) for home and commercial use – quality equipment at cost-effective prices. Check out our range and start your own home-made clothes sewing journey today.

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