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heavy duty sewing machine

Support Your Local Sewing Shop

heavy-duty sewing machine

Singer 96k industrial sewing machine

Need some sewing supplies for your heavy-duty sewing machine? Can we encourage you to shop locally?

Globalisation means there are fewer sewing and haberdashery stores than there once were. Fifty or 60 years ago, it would have been commonplace for every town to have a shop that sold supplies for sewing machines, heavy-duty sewing machines and regular ones.

Most households would have had at least one person who knew how to sew, and clothes were mended and repaired or created from scratch. Local sewing and haberdashery shops catered to their needs – you could stock up on all kinds of fabric and materials, needles, thread, zippers, buttons, pins and more.

Sadly, many of these shops are long gone. It’s had to be an independent shop these days, as rents are so expensive, but those few sewing and haberdashery stores that survive are a delight.

There’s something about the smell of a haberdashery shop that is nostalgic. It’s a distinct aroma, the smell of cotton and large swathes of material waiting to be cut up to the customer’s requirement. (And there is also something special about watching someone cut that material, the skill they use to cut it so quickly and cleanly.)

The best shops are usually staffed by people who are sewing enthusiasts themselves and can give you plenty of advice and help with your own project. You’ll find patterns, unusual materials which will make your own project 100 percent unique, and beautiful buttons that can add zing to an existing coat or jacket.

Some local shops even offer sewing lessons – and if you’ve just bought your heavy-duty sewing machines and you are at a bit of a loss as to how to use it, we can’t recommend these lessons highly enough. Another bonus of lessons is that you will meet other sewing enthusiasts, and those friendships are likely to last beyond the classes. After all, you’ll probably want to meet up with your new friends to discuss ongoing projects or show off your stuff when it’s finished.

Because we specialise in the sale of the heavy-duty sewing machine (as well as refurbished sewing machines and second-hand models), the ethos of shopping at small, independent sewing and haberdashery shops sits well with us. You might have to travel a little bit out of your area to find one near you, but go on. We think you’ll be pleasantly surprised!

Where Does Quilting Come From?

heavy-duty sewing machineA heavy duty sewing machine can make light work of the thickest quilt – but have you ever wondered where this hobby comes from?

Quilting can be enormously satisfying, as well as very creative. Quilts can be personalised to the recipient, and there are many beautiful examples of specially made-quilts. Quilting uses a needle and thread to join two or more layers of material together, and a heavy duty sewing machine or a machine with a walking foot will make light work of this task. The most commonly-used stitches are rocking, straight or running stitches.

People have been quilting for practical and creative purposes for centuries, although few surviving examples pre-date the 18th Century. At that time, silks were the most commonly used materials for quilts, and quilted petticoats were popular.

By the end of the 18th Century and into the 19th Century, changes in textile manufacturing saw the spread of printed cotton fabrics, and these were incorporated in quilts. Cottons were pieced together using a mosaic patch work method. By the mid-19th Century, cotton was much cheaper and rich, contemporary quilters began to favour silk and velvet. Synthetic dyes had been created too, which gave rise to vibrantly coloured and patterned cloths.

In Victorian homes, you might see patchwork cushions, throws, tea cosies and more, beautifully embellished and trimmed.

The wholecloth quilt flourished in the late 19th and early 20th Century, particularly in Wales, the Scottish borders and the north of England. A wholecloth quilt is as the name suggests, made from one continuous piece of fabric. They rely on elaborate, decorative stitching and often incorporate embellishments such as beading. Quilt stampers were professional markers who drew the designs onto plain or pieced material. Different areas developed their own unique style – feathers and twisted ropes were common in the North Country, and in Wales, you would find leaves and spirals.

In Colonial America, quilts were mostly wholecloth and medallion style (a quilt with a central ornamental panel and borders). Patchwork quilting dates back to the 1770s and quilts often mixed silk, linen, wool and cotton in the same piece. As paper was so scarce, women often used letters, newspaper clipping and catalogues to provide the pattern and insulation.

In the UK, quilting became less popular in the 20th Century, thanks to two world wars and a scarcity of materials, and competition from commercially made products. But by the 1960s, there was a resurgence of interest in this beautiful art form, and in 1979, the Quilters Guild was established to ensure the craft was kept alive and passed on to new generations of quilters.

A heavy duty sewing machine can help you with thick quilts, as can a walking foot. Check out our selection of sewing machines to find what you need for quilting.

 

With thanks to the Quilters Guild.

 

Heavy Duty Sewing Machine – Corset Making

heavy duty sewing machineAre you interested in making your own corsets – you might need a heavy duty sewing machine, depending on the material.

Corset wearing and making is something that has exploded in popularity. It’s partly thanks to the likes of the Kardashians, who have been pictured wearing them. (We wouldn’t recommend wearing one during a workout, however!) There’s also been a trend in certain figures – the super-curvy hourglass with an exaggerated hip to waist ratio, which most women don’t have.

Corsets can just look lovely for occasional wear, though. If you make your own, you get to create a customised product that will fit your dimensions. When you wear a corset, a made-to-measure version will be the most comfortable. And believe us, you want your corset to be comfortable…

Leather corsets can give you that cool steampunk look. You will definitely need a heavy duty sewing machine if you are going to work with leather, though.

Here are some tips for making your own corsets:

  • Use a basic pattern if you haven’t made one before, as corsets are complicated. A good design should be adjustable so you can fit it to your own measurements
  • Be honest when you are taking your measurements! We know this sounds silly, but precise measurements will give you the best results for your corset. A great pattern will suggest multiple places to measure. Good designs also allow about two inches at the back for lacing it up.
  • Corset Coutil is intended specifically for corsets. You need a sturdy fabric as corsets undergo a lot of tension. Leather is sometimes used too. Brocade is nice too, especially if your corset is going to be on show.
  • An underbust corset offers more comfort and is easier to make than an over bust corset.
  • Spiral steel flats are the best choice for the corset boning. If you plan to use your corset for waist training (i.e. reducing the size of your waist over a period of time), your corset needs to have about 16 bones.
  • You can use craft glue to tip the bones, so there are no rough edges.
  • You will need about five metres of lace for your corset. Cable cord is a good choice because the lacing needs to be sturdy.

There is lots of information about making your own corsets online. Check out these guides (WikiHow, Instructables) if you’d like to make your own. It’s a fun project to do, and you might find your skills in high demand if you can master the art!

Sewing4Everyone sells pre-used and refurbished sewing machines, including the heavy duty sewing machine. See our semi-industrial sewing machines here.

Heavy Duty Sewing Machines for Leather

If you have always loved the look of custom leather products and wished you could create something similar yourself then you’ll need a heavy duty sewing machine and here at Sewing4Everyone we have a wide selection of perfectly engineered heavy duty sewing machines to suit every need and budget.

Leather products are often some of the most durable fashions but they can also be some of the most difficult products to create. Leather is a material that is thick and resistant, it doesn’t like having a needle stuck in it and much less does it life having a complicated stitch pattern into it and this is why you need to use a heavy duty sewing machine. When you have a sewing machine designed for use on heavy duty and leather items you’ll find that leather items are fun and easy to create.

heavy duty sewing machines

But how can you find the best sewing machine for leather, which will meet all your needs. Within our page of heavy duty sewing machines you will see numerous sewing machines available; by clicking here you can find out more about the sewing machines and select the best one for your needs.

Heavy duty sewing machines are ideal for all products such as shoes, equestrian products, handbags, leather sofas, upholstered furniture, saddles, sails, seat covers, automotive upholstery, safety belts, military belts, industrial safety products and so much more. The options of leather products that you can create with a good quality heavy duty sewing machine really are endless.

heavy duty sewing machines

Our stocked heavy duty sewing machines have been designed and built to handle extended daily use, a good quality heavy duty sewing machine will be built to last and it will be durable as well as dependable. Heavy fabrics such as leather and even denim are incredibly well suited to heavy duty sewing machines.

Here at Sewing4Everyone we have the experience and knowledge to help you select the best heavy duty sewing machine for your needs and budget, why not contact us now to see how we can help you choose the correct sewing machine.

heavy duty sewing machines

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